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GC Digital Initiatives Upcoming Workshops and a Talk

Workshop: “WordPress II: Customizing, Stylizing and Integrating with Social Media” Thursday, March 21st, 2019 6:30-8:30pm

This workshop will involve a conceptual and technical discussion of how to integrate social media with your WordPress site. We will discuss how you can customize and style your site – including changing the layout of the site by choosing a different theme, adding functionality with plugins, customizing menus, changing your site header or coloring across the site using the Customizer function and custom CSS, and modifying the basic structure of the site by building a child-theme. Since we will not be covering how to create a WordPress site during this workshop, we recommend that you come with a WordPress site that has content that you can work with during the workshop – even if it is only a practice site.

Register HERE

 

Talk: “A Stroll Through the Dark Web” Tuesday, March 26th, 2019 6:30-8:30pm, Room 3317

Matt Goerzen will give a brief rundown of the history, applications, and aspirations of the “dark web” and its infrastructure. The talk will involve a cursory tour of the TOR network and consider a number of contemporary artworks and digital artifacts in its characterization of this fabled place. The talk will touch on artist interventions like Random Darknet Shopper by Mediengruppe Bitnik, radical (and often vaporware) social experiments, and artifacts from mailing list archives, and other communities. Matt Goerzen studies cultures of anonymity, and the technologies that enable them. His current project is to establish a cohesive framework for discussing media vulnerabilities by importing terms-of-craft from computer security research. He is a Researcher on the Media Manipulation project at Data & Society.

This talk is co-sponsored by the ITP Certificate program and the GC Digital Initiatives program.

Register HERE

 

Workshop: “Finding the Right Tools for Mapping” Wednesday, March 27th, 2019 6:30-8:30pm

If you’re thinking about making a map, but you’re not sure what software or services to use, this workshop is for you! We will review popular mapping tools and compare the pros and cons of each one, including functionality, price, and accessibility.

Register HERE

April 4 | Careers for Humanists in Research, Education, and Outreach

Thursday, 4 April 2019, 5:00–7:00pm

Art History Lounge, Room 3408

This event is co-sponsored by the PublicsLab, the Office of Career Planning and Professional Development, the Department of Art History, and the Department of History.

Four humanities PhDs (including two alumni of The Graduate Center!) working at the Rockefeller Archive Center (RAC) will discuss possible career trajectories for humanities PhDs, including soft money positions, the relationship between academic and non-academic jobs, and how to manage the varied commitments entailed by pursuing a graduate degree. As a team, they are responsible for building the Center’s public profile through archival research, digital storytelling, institutional and educational outreach, and organized partnerships with donors, scholars, and foundation practitioners. Panelists were trained in various academic disciplines, and embarked upon distinct paths in pursuit of the doctorate and an alt-ac career.

For more information about panelists, please visit the PublicsLab website.

A panel discussion and Q&A will be followed by the chance to mingle and network. Light refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP.

Upcoming GCDI Workshops and Events

Talk: “Youngmin Kim: Digital Humanities in Asia” Wednesday March 13th, 2019 6:30-8:30pm

Join us as we hear from Youngmin Kim (Professor of English, Distinguished Research Professor at Dongguk University, and Jack Ma Chair Professor of Ma Yun Education Fund at Hangzhou Normal University) discuss the current status of digital humanities scholarship in Asia. His talk will consider digital humanities as participant in the 4th Industrial Revolution transforming itself into an “expanded field” and reminding us of the three V’s in the Fourth Wave of the Industrial Revolution: Volume, Velocity, and Variety (one can add more: Variability and Complexity now). Following Richard Howitt’s application of the concept of the “scale” to representation of “glocalization,” Kim invokes a double movement of the local and the global which contextualizes “the simultaneous and contested shift up-scale towards the global and down-scale to the local as a response to changing economic, political and cultural pressures.” Consequently, he argues, one might “zoom-in and zoom-out” (or “turn closely and go away distantly”) of the object of “DH in Asia,” which, can be seen in the next 2019 JADH-Osaka conference theme of “Localization in Global DH” in “wider East Asia region.”

Register HERE

 

Talk: “What Can You Do with a 3D Reconstruction of Ancient Rome?” Thursday, March 14th, 2019, 6:00-8:00pm

The Rome Reborn project is an international initiative, launched in 1996, to create a 3D reconstruction of ancient Rome in AD 320, shortly before the capital of the empire was moved to Constantinople. This year was chosen because it represents the peak of the urban development of the ancient city. The model took 22 years to complete. In August 2018, it was finally made available to scholars and to the general public through the VR publisher Flyover
Zone Productions. (To see the project visit www.romereborn.org). This talk is will draw out the project’s scientific uses as a tool of discovery, taking as point of departure is the claim that a reconstruction of a complex city like ancient Rome is a case in point of Aristotle’s famous claim that “the whole is not a heap but something other than the sum of the parts.” The presentation will feature 3 virtual reality case studies: the alignment of two monuments seen from a fixed position (the relationship of the Montecitorio Obelisk to the Ara Pacis); the dynamically changing viewsheds available to the visitor in the densely-packed Roman Forum (the visit of Constantius II to Rome in AD 357); and, as noticeable in a series of bird’s eye views, the application of organic, as opposed to geometric, urban planning and land use in the entire cityscape. This workshop is co-sponsored by the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program.

Register HERE

 

Workshop: “Graphic Design for Websites” Tuesday, March 19, 2019, 6:30 – 8:30 pm

“Graphic Design for Websites” will emphasize the basic elements and principles of graphic design in relationship to front end web design aesthetics. Students will be exposed to various examples and applications for WordPress based websites (on the CUNY Academic Commons and beyond). The workshop will also introduce and apply a myriad of Open Education Resources on design, techniques, and software. Hands on exercises will be explored.

Register HERE

 

Workshop: WordPress II: Customizing, Stylizing, and Integrating with Social Media, Thursday, March 21, 2019, 6:30 – 8:30 pm

This workshop will involve a conceptual and technical discussion of how to integrate social media with your WordPress site. We will discuss how you can customize and style your site – including changing the layout of the site by choosing a different theme, adding functionality with plugins, customizing menus, changing your site header or colors across the site using the Customizer function. We will not be covering how to create a WordPress site during this workshop, so we recommend that you come with a WordPress site with some content to begin. WordPress sites can be created for free using the CUNY Academic Commons. Instructions can be found here: https://commons.gc.cuny.edu/register/. You can also use OpenCUNY: https://opencuny.org/wp-signup.php.

Register HERE

March workshops in the library

To register for the workshops, please click on the title of the event and use the RSVP button on the event page.

Research for Master’s Students

March 13, 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

In this workshop we will discuss research at a graduate level. Topics to be covered include searching for resources, choosing a topic, evaluating sources, and formatting a paper. Attendees will come away with strategies for taking their research to the next level.

Zotero on Your Laptop

March 20, 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Join us for a hands-on introduction to managing citations with Zotero, a free and open source research tool that makes organizing your research and creating bibliographies a breeze. Please bring a laptop with you, and make sure you can install software on it, so our instructors can help you get started on your own devices.

– Learn the basics of Zotero

– Install Zotero on your laptop

– Create a Zotero account

– Place citations into your Zotero account

– Create a bibliography using Microsoft Word plug-in

Archival Research

March 27, 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Please join us for “Archival Research: The Basics.” We’ll explore the fundamentals of archival research in this workshop, including defining what archives are and how they are arranged.  We’ll also discuss where and how to look for sources and go over what to expect when you visit an archival repository or conduct research from afar.

Bring your laptop to follow along.

 

Deadline Mar 11 | Apply to Participate in the TLC’s Socially Conscious Pedagogy Focused Inquiry Group

2019 Socially Conscious Pedagogy Focused Inquiry Group

Are you interested in pedagogies that address a variety of oppressive and marginalizing forces in the university classroom? Participants in the Teaching and Learning Center’s 2019 Developing a Socially Conscious Pedagogy Focused Inquiry Group will build on previous SCP work by researching, reading, discussing and writing about higher education pedagogies that are self-reflexive, responsive and subversive of hegemonic social and educational practices. Expanding on work around educator positionality, this group will examine academic and non-academic texts with the goal of co-creating a “self-care tool kit” for Graduate Center students teaching at CUNY. We will gather, curate and reflect on tools and strategies (intellectual, emotional, spiritual and logistical) used by college educators to empower and sustain their teaching practice as educators of color and/or for students of color.

Participants will be asked to attend a total of 6 meetings between the beginning of April and the end of June (bi-weekly) in which we will first research, read and discuss texts that center the voices and experiences of educators and students of color. We will then meet in June for two working sessions in which we will co-create a toolkit.

To submit an application for this Focused Inquiry Group, please include a CV and respond to the following prompt in approximately 3-500 words:

How does your positionality (or positionalities) in the classroom inform how you design your courses? What elements of your identity and personal history show up in your pedagogical practices?

Participants must be able to meet on a Monday or Tuesday, commit to 6 one-hour long sessions, and contribute writing to a common deliverable (the toolkit). Selected participants will receive a $500 stipend. Selections will be determined based on the clarity of the connection between positionality and teaching practice, as well as to ensure that there is a diversity of disciplines and/or lenses represented.

Deadline for submissions is Monday, March 11th by 6pm via an email to tlc@gc.cuny.edu.

If you have further questions please email slaksimimorrow@gradcenter.cuny.edu

ITP Program March Talks and Labs

Talk: “A Stroll Through the Dark Web”

Date: Tuesday, March 26 | 6:30PM

Location: Room 3317

All are welcome; advance registration through Eventbrite is appreciated: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-stroll-through-the-dark-web-tickets-57643334766

Matt Goerzen will give a brief rundown of the history, applications, and aspirations of the “dark web” and its infrastructure. The talk will involve a cursory tour of the TOR network and consider a number of contemporary artworks and digital artifacts in its characterization of this fabled place. The talk will touch on artist interventions like Random Darknet Shopper by Mediengruppe Bitnik, radical (and often vaporware) social experiments, and artifacts from mailing list archives, and other communities.

Matt Goerzen studies cultures of anonymity, and the technologies that enable them. His current project is to establish a cohesive framework for discussing media vulnerabilities by importing terms-of-craft from computer security research. He is a Researcher on the Media Manipulation project at Data & Society. (more…)

Mar 1 | Incorporating Cultural Content in the Language Classroom

Friday, March 1, 2019
4:00 – 6:00pm, Room 9207

Many language instructors enter the classroom for the first time without knowledge of language acquisition principles. They are often asked to design their classes based on a textbook that doesn’t speak to students’ experiences and fails to appeal directly to them. New instructors often feel pressured to teach following a grammar-oriented approach that seems to leave little room for practical language skills.

These issues and others have emerged as part of a year-long inquiry into the challenges of teaching languages at CUNY facilitated by the Teaching and Learning Center. Join participants in our Focused Inquiry Group to discuss strategies for balancing grammatical and cultural content to create engaging language learning environments. We will examine different source materials, from textbooks to movies, music videos and Open Educational Resources (OER), and will offer concrete ideas on how to adapt these materials to the needs of various classes. We’ll explore selected language acquisition frameworks, such as Task-based learning and Implicit vs. Explicit Knowledge, that can allow faculty to use culturally relevant content while meeting class goals. Participants are invited to bring any instructional materials that they use. All language instructors are welcome.

RSVP here: http://cuny.is/tlc-spring-19.

Due Mar 1 | NEH Summer Institute 2019

The National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute, “Privilege and Prejudice: Jewish History in the American South” will be held from May 27-June 7, 2019, at the College of Charleston. We are particularly seeking faculty and graduate students of southern history and literature, Jewish studies, ethnic studies, religious studies, public history, and museum studies.

 Led by scholarly experts from across the nation, this seminar aims to revise our understanding of the entwined histories of the American South and its Jewish inhabitants, demonstrating the region’s cosmopolitan past and its relationship to both diversity and discrimination. The institute will prepare college and university teachers of southern or American history to incorporate Jewish history into their courses, expose Jewish studies scholars to the geographic range of American Jewish history, and encourage public historians to showcase cultural, ethnic, and religious groups in their local settings.

Each participant will receive a stipend of $2,100 for the two-week institute to help cover travel, housing, meals, and other expenses.

For more information and to apply, please visit https://jewishsouthsummer.cofc.edu/ [na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com]

Feb 26 | CFP – Abstract Writing Workshop

Do you see a conference in your future? If so, please join us for the Writing Services CFP – Abstract Writing Workshop.

About the Workshop

On Tuesday, February 26, 2019, from 6:00 – 8:00 pm, in room 3317, we’ll meet for a brief a presentation detailing some of the “best practices” of CFP answering and abstract composition. After the presentation, students will workshop their CFPs in peer editing groups. We ask that students bring a paper copy of the CFP and the abstract they’d like to workshop.

Please RSVP

If you’re planning on coming to our workshop, please RSVP using our event registration form:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSch6I5NKGfXG_sjRdevhJ65q6nAEFULq2JeBGDip7ma9JIXGQ/viewform.

See flyer here CFP – Abstract Writing Workshop

Feb 19 | TLC Workshop: Teaching as an International Student: The Collaborative Classroom in Theory and Practice

Tuesday, February 19th, 4-6pm, Room 9206
https://cuny.is/tlc-spring-19 

Teaching as an international student takes much hard work and trial and error. As international graduate students, we often jungle many unknowns when we engage CUNY classrooms, classrooms that may look and feel quite different from the ones to which we have been habituated. We might know little about our students’ previous educational experiences, their cultural and academic worlds, the U.S-based university system as a whole and the CUNY system in particular. Some of us are teaching as non-native speakers of English for the first time. Figuring out what kind of instructors we can and want to be, how to communicate clearly, how to best engage our students, how to be helpful during office hours and how to give useful feedback can be overwhelming. (more…)

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